THE Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) has assembled a group of industry players to help the financial sector regulator develop a guide on the responsible and ethical use of artificial intelligence (AI) and data analytics by financial institutions.  The 10-member Fairness, Ethics, Accountability and Transparency (Feat) Committee will be co-chaired by MAS chief data officer David Hardoon and PrimePartners co-founder Hsieh Fu Hua, the MAS said in a statement on Monday.  Also on the committee are Senior Counsel V K Rajah, Singtel non-executive independent director Teo Swee Lian, Allianz chief data scientist Raymond Au; DBS chief data and transformation officer Paul Cobban, Standard Chartered Bank chief data officer Shameek Kundu, United Overseas Bank chief data officer Richard Lowe, OCBC Bank head of group customer analytics and decisioning Donald MacDonald, and Singapore Exchange head of fintech and data Kelvin Tan.  The MAS is aiming to complete the guide by the end of the year, and will be engaging the industry in the second quarter of 2018.  The guide will "set out key principles and best practices for the use of artificial intelligence and data analytics, helping financial institutions to strengthen internal governance and reduce risks of data misuse", the MAS said in a statement.  The MAS is also working with Singapore's Infocomm Media Development Authority on developing a broader understanding of artificial intelligence governance across sectors.

THE Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) has assembled a group of industry players to help the financial sector regulator develop a guide on the responsible and ethical use of artificial intelligence (AI) and data analytics by financial institutions.

ASIA CREDIT CLOSE: Traders shrug off trade tariffs, bond supply fears

ASIA CREDIT CLOSE: Traders shrug off trade tariffs, bond supply fears

Chinese high-yield bonds were marginally weaker, but there was no sign of a sell-off in metals-related credits, despite growing rhetoric from the US about trade tariffs on steel and aluminium.

Asia's debt market: a story of progress

Asia's debt market: a story of progress

Back in 1994, when I first moved to Hong Kong, the debt capital markets in Asia excluding Japan were almost non-existent. The only way domestic issuers could raise financing was from the loan market, either domestically or offshore, or in the G3 currencies (US dollar, euro or Japanese yen) for the best of them. The few “bonds” were actually loan-style fixed-rated notes, syndicated primarily to banks.

Who will buy Singapore's $24b infrastructure bond issue?

Who will buy Singapore's $24b infrastructure bond issue?

Singapore is about to embark on a massive bond issuance program that will literally change the landscape. These new infrastructure bonds will be longer dated than traditional Singapore government bonds and will enable investors to lock in high quality paper for the long term.